The International Naval Research Organization is a non-profit organization dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships. The principal activity of INRO for over 50 years has been the publication of a quarterly journal, Warship International, recognized internationally as the leading and most authoritative publication in the field. Auxiliary services include a Book Service, offering a 10 per cent discount on current naval books, and the Photo Service, which provides warship photos at a nominal price.
© 2017 International Naval Research Organization
December 2018

International Naval Research Organization

Publishers of Warship International
The Canadian anti-submarine frigate HMCS Ottawa (DDE 229) This aerial view illustrates the Canadian Navy’s anti–submarine frigate HMCS Ottawa (DDE 229). The date and location of the photograph is unknown. During a 1962/63 refit the single funnel, as originally built, was replaced with twin funnels. This photograph shows the ship with twin funnels, thus the photograph was taken sometime after the 1962/63 refit. The photograph is © by the Canadian Armed Forces. The ship is named after the Ottawa River of Canada. Ottawa is a member of the St. Laurent class of anti–submarine warships. This class was built between the years of 1950 to 1956 and was the first class of warships to be designed completely in Canada. (Note the partial whaleback design at the joint of the hull and deck. This was a Canadian design feature of this class. It was intended to prevent ice from forming during operations in the harsh Canadian weather.) Much design guidance was received from the Royal Navy and the USN. Their design was worked out so that in the time of an emergency they could be built rapidly and in quantity. A large amount of aluminum was used in place of steel in their superstructure. The original cost was estimated to be to be $15,000,000. The cost was officially raised to $23,000,000 for each ship. This class of ships received the nickname of “cadillacs” due to their relative luxurious crew accommodations. Ottawa left active service on 31 July 1992 at Halifax. She was broken up in India during 1994. Design as built. Propulsion: - Geared turbines drive two shafts giving a S.H.P. of 20,000 with a speed in excess of 25 knots, using two water tube boilers. Displacement - 2,000 tons standard, full load 2,600 tons. Length - 366 feet (oa), Beam – 42 feet, Draft – 13.25 feet. Complement: - 20 officers & 270 men, wartime figures. Armament: - 2 triple-barreled depth charge mortars and homing torpedoes. 4 – 3 inch guns, 50 cal. AA in twin mounts, 40 mm AA Bofors mounts (single). Aviation: - Had a capacity for one Sea King helicopter after receiving a modernization. The information appearing above was taken from the 1959-1960 edition of Jane’s Fighting Ships and various locations on the Internet.
The International Naval Research Organization is a non- profit organization dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships. The principal activity of INRO for over 50 years has been the publication of a quarterly journal, Warship International, recognized internationally as the leading and most authoritative publication in the field. Auxiliary services include a Book Service, offering a 10 per cent discount on current naval books, and the Photo Service, which provides warship photos at a nominal price.
Add your one line caption using the Image tab of the Web Properties dialog
© 2015 International Naval Records Organization
December 2018

International Naval Research Organization

Publishers of Warship International