The International Naval Research Organization is a non-profit organization dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships. The principal activity of INRO for over 50 years has been the publication of a quarterly journal, Warship International, recognized internationally as the leading and most authoritative publication in the field. Auxiliary services include a Book Service, offering a 10 per cent discount on current naval books, and the Photo Service, which provides warship photos at a nominal price.
© 2017 International Naval Research Organization
December 2017

International Naval Research Organization

Publishers of Warship International
German Panzerschiff Admiral Scheer The Admiral Scheer was a member of the German Navy’s Deutschland class of warships which also included the famous ship Admiral Graf Spee.  Since the inception of this design by the German Navy, this class of ships has been known as “Super Cruisers,” heavy cruisers and possibly the most famous name was “Pocket Battleship.”  The ship is named after Admiral Reinhard Scheer of WW I fame.  This class of three German cruisers was considered to be of a design that was revolutionary. The philosophy of this design was “if you could not sink it, then outrun it; if you could not outrun it, then sink it.” The Admiral Scheer was built at the Wilhelmshaven Navy Yard, and commissioned 12 November 1934.  The Admiral Scheer was at Kiel where she was bombed and capsized on 9/10 April 1945. Laid Down 1931, Launched 1933; Standard Displacement: 12,100 tons; Machinery: Eight MAN diesel engines, two screws, reported speed 28 Knots; Armament: Six 11 inch, eight 5.9, inch eight 4.1 MM AA, eight TT in two quad mounts, and other various smaller AA  guns. One publication states that the Scheer underwent a general refit during 1940.  At this time a clipper bow (also known as an Atlantic bow) was fitted.  We do not have any photograph in our files of the ship with the new bow. From 27 October 1940 through 1 April 1941, the Scheer undertook an extended raiding cruise.  This cruise covered the North and South Atlantic and the Western Indian Ocean and evolved into a 46,000 nautical mile journey. On 5 November 1940 the Scheer intercepted a convoy in the Atlantic.  One of the escort ships of the convoy was the armed merchant cruiser Jervis Bay. The crew of the Jervis Bay numbered 254, of which only 68 survived the sinking after putting up a fierce battle to protect the convoy. This photograph is from the I.N.R.O. Archives.  It is © J. F. Lehmanns Verlag, Munchen and is dated 1938.  The location of the photograph is noted as Kiel.  The information in this review is from various web sites and the following two books, The German Navy in World War Two, by Jak P. Mallmann Showell and Warships of the World, Victory Edition, by Roger Kafka & Roy L. Peppereburg.
The International Naval Research Organization is a non- profit organization dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships. The principal activity of INRO for over 50 years has been the publication of a quarterly journal, Warship International, recognized internationally as the leading and most authoritative publication in the field. Auxiliary services include a Book Service, offering a 10 per cent discount on current naval books, and the Photo Service, which provides warship photos at a nominal price.
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© 2015 International Naval Records Organization
December 2017

International Naval Research Organization

Publishers of Warship International