The International Naval Research Organization is a non-profit organization dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships. The principal activity of INRO for over 50 years has been the publication of a quarterly journal, Warship International, recognized internationally as the leading and most authoritative publication in the field. Auxiliary services include a Book Service, offering a 10 per cent discount on current naval books, and the Photo Service, which provides warship photos at a nominal price.
© 2017 International Naval Research Organization
January 2018

International Naval Research Organization

Publishers of Warship International
Japanese Cruiser Ashigara This photograph depicts the Japanese heavy “Treaty Class” cruiser Ashigara, of the Myôkô class, at anchor, as a small craft approaches the stern of the vessel. This photograph was taken at either the Coronation Review of King George VI, on 20 May 1937, or the German Navy Day Review at Kiel, on 31 May 1937.  The photograph is undated. The four ships of this class were intended to be built under the 10,000 ton limit of the Washington Naval Treaty.  The ship was named after Mount Ashigara.  The Ashigara was laid down on 11 April 1925, launched on 22 April 1928, completed 20 August 1929 with the construction by Kawasaki, Kobe. During the planning and construction of the ship, many changes were made to the original designs.  These changes included a fifth 7.9 in. main turret, additional AA armament, various additions and/or deletions to the torpedo tubes, and the installation of additional armor protection to various areas of the hull and superstructure.  These changes increased the displacement to 13,300 tons!  During 1931 – 1934, the main armament of the ships of the class was changed to 20.3cm, a true 8 in. bore.  In 1936 Ashigara was strengthened due to severe storm damage.  During the periods of 1939/41 and 1943/1944, additional alterations were made to the ship (additional AA armament, radar and additional torpedo tubes). During WW II Ashigara participated in a number of major engagements.  Included in the list were: 1. Operations in the Philippines 2. Operations in the Dutch East Indies 3. Sinking of HMS Exeter & Encounter 4. Transportation of various troop units 5. Battle of Leyte Gulf. On 8 June 1945, Ashigara left Batavia for Singapore with 1,600 troops aboard.  During this transit, HMS Trenchant intercepted and attacked Ashigara, firing eight torpedoes, of which five struck the cruiser.  Over 1,200 troops and 100 crewmen went down with the ship. Information for this review has been obtained from various internet websites, and the following books; 1941 Jane’s Fighting Ships, Cruisers of World War Two, An International Encyclopedia by M. J. Whitley, and Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War by Eric Lacroix and Linton Wells II.
The International Naval Research Organization is a non- profit organization dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships. The principal activity of INRO for over 50 years has been the publication of a quarterly journal, Warship International, recognized internationally as the leading and most authoritative publication in the field. Auxiliary services include a Book Service, offering a 10 per cent discount on current naval books, and the Photo Service, which provides warship photos at a nominal price.
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© 2015 International Naval Records Organization
January 2018

International Naval Research Organization

Publishers of Warship International